Aviation Law News

Aviation Accidents

It has been predicted that airline accident rates will grow in a corresponding ratio to the increasing number of airline passengers.

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The NTSB

The NTSB, which operates independently of other government agencies, is primarily responsible for investigating aviation accidents and issuing safety recommendations based on its findings. While the NTSB has no direct regulatory or enforcement power with regard to aviation law, it does have significant power of influence on those who can effect change. In fact, approximately 80 percent of all NTSB safety recommendations are adopted by the FAA or other regulatory agencies.

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Your Legal Rights

Aviation law is becoming increasingly important, as the number of passengers and airplane flights grows larger. Human mistakes and mechanical difficulties are two of the most common causes of aviation accidents. Our expert aviation accident attorneys can help families and victims of aircraft accidents and help eliminate preventable disasters from occurring in the future.

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"FAA: Runway Errors More Common than Expected"

January 23 , 2007

TThe Federal Aviation Administration has found that runway errors like the one that led to the Lexington, Kentucky crash that killed 49 people are fairly common.

An FAA official searched through 10 years of records and found 117 other cases where an aircraft went down the wrong runway.

There have been at least two more recently that were not included in the report.

Recent Runway Error Incidents

In one of these recent incidents, a Boeing 757 owned by Continental Airlines landed on a taxiway instead of a parallel runway on accident in Newark. Fortunately, there was no one or nothing else on the taxiway at the time. No damage resulted.

An Alaska Airlines 737 also recently took off from the wrong runway.

In the Kentucky crash, a plane took off from a runway that was too short and crashed shortly after takeoff killing everyone on board but the copilot.

The National Transportation Safety Board has named “runway incursion” as one of issues that needs to be addressed most urgently. It also said the FAA’s previous responses to recommendations on correcting this were unacceptable.

More Errors?

There may be even more errors than the FAA reported because the National Transportation Safety Board’s definition of “runway incursion” counts only incidents where a plane, vehicle, or pedestrian get onto the runway.

By this definition, the fatal Lexington, Kentucky incident would not have been counted.

A Proposed Solution

Some have proposed the implementation of new software that could be installed into current navigation systems on airplanes to reduce runway mistakes. The new software would sense the airplane’s position using the plane’s GPS and announce in a mechanized voice if the pilot has brought the plane to the wrong runway, or if the runway is too short. But the FAA does not require the use of this software, and it costs about $18,000 per plane.

Harmed in an aviation accident? Please contact us today for a free consultation with one of our accomplished aviation attorneys. You may be able to recover compensation for your losses.

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Read More News Articles...

September 28, 2007 - Government Takes Action Regarding Delayed Flights

September 14, 2007 - New Flight Plan Sparks Lawsuit

August 3, 2007 - Airlines In Trouble

July 27, 2007 - Two Men Awarded $54M in Plane Crash Settlement

Legal Rights
Aviation law is becoming increasingly important, as the number of passengers and airplane flights grows larger. Human mistakes and mechanical difficulties are two of the most common causes of aviation accidents. Our expert aviation accident attorneys can help families and victims of aircraft accidents and help eliminate preventable disasters from occurring in the future.

| Back to top